MATERIALS OF

MEDIEVAL ART.

Private group tour at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

led by Paul Werner, PhD, DSFS.

Wednesdays, 1:30 pm, February 6 and February 13

Additional information: http://theorangepress.com/events

Contact: werner@theorangepress.com

Close examination of original artworks on panels, vellum and paper leads us to questions about the materials used, how they were used, how they were produced and for what purposes, social and formal. Proto-Renaissance panel painting, German Hebrew book production and “Persian” Illumination are examined for reciprocal contributions and distinctive featrures.

$50 per individual session. No-one should pay more than is reasonable for their own circumstances. Please pay whatever you consider a fair exchange for what you've learned in this class.

 

SYLLABUS

 

Here is the bibliography I cited in class during our first session. Should you decide to acquire any of these, you may want to consider doing so through Powell's, a unionized bookstore. (I get a percentage of each sale.)

At the outset I mentioned André Leroi-Gourhan, the French anthropologist who was a student of Marcel Mauss and had a large influence on French poststructuralists, especially Barthes, Derrida, Deleuze and Castoriadis. Unfortunately, Leroi-Gourhan's original theories about the interaction of bodies and techniques appear to be only available in French, in Évolution et techniques. His later book, on gestures, is available in English, and there's a very recent book by Carrie Noland that seems to take up Leroi-Gourhan's argument.

I also mentioned Daniel Varney Thompson, the author of a series of books about Medieval techniques, and the editor of a number of medieval technical handbooks. Notable among these, Cennini's Libro dell'Arte, which happens to be pretty notable in itself. Not to mention funny....

J. J. G. Alexander has some useful secondary sources, Mark Clarke is up-to-date on primary sources, their location and their meaning.

And finally, a wondrous and deeply informative novel, on Islamic painting and art in general: Orhan Pamuk's My Name is Red.

See you next week!

 

Additional information: http://theorangepress.com/events

Contact: werner@theorangepress.com